Inside the Locker Room: Short-handed Goals

short-hand·ed
ˌSHôrtˈhandəd/
adjective
1. not having enough of the usual number.

As I attend various sporting events, I sometimes come across situations that I either don’t fully understand, or that I want to understand a little better.
This happened Sunday afternoon as I watched Prosper Ice Hockey take on Plano West in the summer championship.
During the second period of play, Prosper was down by one and fighting aggressively. Because of this, they had a couple of penalties. At one point, the Eagles found themselves “short-handed” in a five-on-three situation, meaning they had three players to Plano West’s five. This put Plano West with a greater scoring advantage. But what happened next is what led me to my research.
In a shocking turn of events, Prosper player, Tyler Hagenbrock, skated end to end to score an unassisted goal against Plano West.
So, I did a little digging and found that five-on-three short-handed goals are extremely rare in the NHL. As a matter of fact, I could only find a little more than 20 instances in the history of the NHL where this has happened. And only one player in the NHL, Philadelphia Flyers’ Mike Richards, has scored three in his career. If you would like to see the most exciting series of short-handed goals in one game, check out the game between the Boston Bruins and Carolina Hurricanes from April 10, 2010. The Bruins scored three short-handed goals in only 1:04 minutes of play on a hooking penalty. That minor penalty would prove to be costly for Carolina.
Unfortunately for the Eagles, Hagenbrock’s goal would be the only one of the game and they came up short against Plano West. But none-the-less, Hagenbrock skates away with a cool stat he can add to his resume.

If there is something sports related you would like to see explained or mentioned “Inside the Locker Room” please email Renee Marler at Renee@CedarbrookMedia.com.

 

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